Kayla Byers, Class of 2016, Marylhurst University

Global Connections: Rural Sociology & Food Systems and Society

by Kayla Byers ’16, M.S. in Food Systems and Society

Under the sweltering sun, thanks in part to the sweating crops, the XIV World Congress of Rural Sociology conference took place in Toronto, Canada this August. The 2016 conference theme was “Sustainable and Just Rural Transitions: Connections and Complexities” and with that theme, it seemed fitting to apply to present my thesis research “Not-So-Free Trade Agreements: Discursive Framings of Food Systems Benefits and Burdens Around Free Trade Agreements.”


Happy Birthday, Marylhurst University!

Today is a special day for Marylhurst University. July 29th is the day, back in 1893, that the State of Oregon granted a charter authorizing our founders, the Sisters of the Holy Names, to confer baccalaureate degrees. We call it Charter Day and celebrate July 29th as Marylhurst University’s birthday. In 1893, we were located […]


A Science Communicator in the Making

by Tara Campbell My dad set up our first computer in the kitchen when I was eight years old. It was beige with a dark green screen and a keyboard that made the most wonderful clacking sound—a sound to this day that I find soothing. From the first time the text-based game Zork loaded, I […]

Christy Pagels, M.A. in Art Therapy Counseling

How to start an art therapy practice

by Christy Pagels ’06, LPC, ATR-BC

Though I’ve been doing art therapy and counseling for about a decade, this past year has been a real learning experience for me, as I started my private practice. Of course, each job and even each client I worked with in that time has taught me much about being a therapist, but making this career change has been a different kind of challenge and opportunity for growth.


Returning to college? Five things you should consider

by Karl Erickson

The decision to return to school to complete my English degree was a choice I’ve never regretted, but I sometimes struggle making a quick explanation when people ask me about it. Why did I enroll in the university again after a quarter century in the workplace? What prompted a 47-year-old father, husband, author, photographer and state employee (of nearly two decades) to infuse even more chaos into his busy schedule?


The Legend of MU English

by Ken Schultz Not to make it seem pretentious (since each person’s experience is unique and interesting in and of itself), I love it when the authors of super-complex narratives reveal the behind-the-scenes subtexts of their work. It’s like being together with an intimate friend, side-by-side during the act of creation. In the interest of […]


Three Steps to Happiness

We talked with John McPhee about his upcoming TEDxMarylhurstU talk, GGG2Greatness. Here’s what John had to say:

I used to work in the Australian outback mining hard rock. For many years, I vacillated between study and work. Over more than a decade, I watched as my peers moved from school to college to jobs to relationships and families. And I wondered what they had that I didn’t. I wanted to be happy – but wasn’t clear as to how to get there.


Your Brain on Star Wars

by Greg Crosby

I am passionate about my TEDx topic, Your Brain on Star Wars, because the brain and the movie Star Wars are each a journey and an adventure unto themselves. It is fascinating to experience talking about Star Wars with others. There is such a communal connection that people have about this movie. Both the brain and Star Wars deal with the unknown, adventure of dealing with adversity and the need to locate hope and have resilience or surrender to the dark side.

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Blurred Impact

by Bethany McCamish

The ability to see is what allows one to process and perceive visual information. Abstracting and blurring the urban environment and natural surroundings that I photograph allows one to then see and therefore perceive the environment in a non-literal way.


The Impact of Food Choices

by Kristy Athens

We all know the drill when it comes to talking about food: Everybody eats, so it’s a universal issue. But this is where the “universal-ness” of food ends. People have varying levels of interest in the matter, from eating only because it’s a physical necessity, to caring so much that they struggle to travel or visit friends and relatives because they can’t confirm the origins of the food served to them.