Archives: Art

donna-dorio

From beginning to beginning again

by Donna D’Orio I do not remember a time when I was not drawn to utilitarian, traditional art forms. The texture of handwoven dishtowels, crockery bowls out of kilns from Kentucky and North Carolina, and hand-hewn axe blades were part of my everyday childhood world. It did not go by me unnoticed, the difference, when […]

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Designing for an inn at the corner of the earth

Reiko Igarashi, interior design faculty at Marylhurst University, designed laser-cut hangers for the boutique Fogo Island Inn. This unique bed-and-breakfast resides on Fogo Island, which lies off the coast of Newfoundland, Canada, and plans to open in summer 2014. How did she come to be a part of this design project? And what was that […]

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candyce-scott-kinetic-sculpture

The restorative aspect of kinetic art

by Candyce Scott Most people have experienced a feeling of elation in listening to music or watching the surf from the beach. There are visual experiences — such as watching a vibrant sunset or gazing at a beautiful piece of artwork — that causes an emotional response. These responses, in and of themselves, can be […]

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Noelle_bfa-art-promotion

7 Days of Art

Countdown Day #2 Noelle Winiecki | Sculpture studio We’re counting down the days until our 2013 BFA Thesis Exhibition. Watch across social for behind-the-scenes photos of our BFA candidates and their artwork.   UPDATE: You can find all behind-the-scenes photos on our Pinterest board.

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Nuala-Ni-Dhomhnaill

The Irish language: hope through the words of a poet

by Ger Killeen

This is an excerpt of a talk given by Killeen at the annual Irish Language Day at Marylhurst University, May 18, 2013.

One of the most thumbed-through of the books I own in the Irish language is a dictionary: An Irish-English Dictionary compiled and edited by The Rev. Patrick S. Dinneen in 1904. I have other Irish-English dictionaries which are more useful to me than Dinneen’s, dictionaries that are printed in standard Roman type, unlike Dinneen’s which retains the half-uncial lettering and unreformed spelling in which Irish was written for centuries; dictionaries which have kept up with the times and can tell me the Irish words for “injection mould” and “file transfer protocol”; dictionaries laden with all the serviceable, civil service-concocted words necessary for communicating the intricacies of the bureaucratic machinery running the modern Irish state. These are all valuable dictionaries in their own right, and I depend on them almost daily. But I don’t love them the way I do Dinneen’s; I don’t take as much pleasure in them; and they are not nearly as heartbreaking.

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  • Adam-Graves-art-detail

Short Sands Serenade

by Adam Graves As I scrape off and revise another area of the painting, I am reminded of the phenomenological dialogue I have engaged in with this image, the subject, the materials, and the place. Revising is an attempt (sometimes desperate) to bring more truth to the dialogue. Sometimes it takes a big move or […]

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