Archives: Editorials

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Barry Bennett on the Benefits of Unions

Marylhurst MBA faculty member Barry Bennett writes about the need for unions in this recent Oregonian article:

“The “union wage premium” — the amount by which wages of unionized employees exceed those of non-unionized employees — is about 14 percent. In addition, unionized workers are 28 percent more likely than non-unionized workers to have employer-provided health care and 54 percent more likely to have employer pension plans.” Bennett writes.

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Advocating for older workers: 8 practical and beneficial attributes

by Kathryn Hubbell

There are many reports out there telling older workers that no one wants them, or that they will have a lot of difficulty finding a job. One such report in U.S. News two years ago listed misconceptions about older workers, such as short terms on the job if they planned to retire soon, higher salary expectations and reluctance to report to younger bosses.

Fortunately, a number of articles since than have refuted the myths, advocating why hiring older workers is a very good idea. Brian Solis, an expert in social media public relations and whose work I frequently use in my classes, reminds us that one of the things Baby Boomers bring to the office is a “raw work ethic.” He gives an excellent guide to Millennials navigating the workplace in this article and advocates for mutual respect between the generations.

I teach a lot of older workers, and I’m one myself. Let me weigh in for a moment on some of the great, practical attributes older workers bring to their jobs – and by “older,” I don’t just mean Baby Boomers. I also mean workers aged 35 to 70 or so, encompassing at least a couple of generations.

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Cross-post: How the passive voice kills your message

Originally published on January 30, 2014 in Sightline Daily.

by Anna Fahey

As I listened to President Obama’s State of the Union speech Tuesday night, I admit I was encouraged and moved at times. But I couldn’t help giving each sentence Anat Shenker-Osorio’s passive-voice test.

Shenker-Osorio is author of “Don’t Buy It: The Trouble with Talking Nonsense About the Economy.” She’s a language researcher and consultant and one of my favorite messaging gurus.

As she wrote in the Boston Globe a while back, when Obama—or anybody—uses the passive, they invariably fail to say who is to blame or why the challenges and problems and outrages they’re describing exist in the first place. This failure, in turn, leaves us with no good clues about viable solutions. If we don’t know how we got here, it’s hard to figure out how we get where we want to go.

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Life is good in 2050

Originally published in the November issue of The Solutions Journal.

by Jay Beeks

The year 2050 is a good time to look back on the major events in the United States since the turn of the century. There have been great hardships, but we have prevailed and achieved so much. Without question, our greatest challenges have been the unparalleled loss of life and the tremendous destruction caused by global climate change. Fortunately, what at times seemed like the inevitable obliteration of society has subsided to ongoing difficulties interspersed with moments of achievement. Given what could have been had we decided not to act, we have reason to celebrate.

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Distractions from fear

by Kathy Hubbell

The news has become overwhelming in recent months. From the mass shootings in our public places to the first notice of a gun created entirely by a 3-D printer; from the tragic plane crash in San Francisco to the horrific loss of 19 Hotshot firefighters in Arizona – all around us, voices tell us to be afraid. And they’re telling us we should not merely be afraid; we should be terrified – the world around us holds terrors from the minute we wake up in the morning. I’ve said for many years that the most frequent headline in the media is some version of, “Could THIS happen to YOU?” 

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Student reflection: Advice in 500 words or less

by Simon Tam What if you only had 500 words of wisdom to share with your community, your children, or tomorrow’s leaders? This is what I’d tell them: Make every word count. I once heard that “language is the primary moral choice in our life”. The words we choose can build communities, reunite loved ones, […]

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A journey in home energy efficiency

by Zach Henkin

I have had a fascination for efficiency ever since my parents first installed a large globe-style fluorescent lamp to replace an incandescent overhead bulb in my childhood bedroom. This fascination for energy has steadily progressed and, as luck would have it, so has technology.

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Death of the Telephone

by Simon Tam

Last week, someone accused my work with social media marketing “irrelevant.” They claimed that organizations did not need an online marketing specialist — that it was a waste of resources. It reminded me of something I saw on television.

During the first season of Downton Abbey, there was an amusing bit when the family decided to install a telephone. It being 1914, no one knew how to use one. Several members of the household even questioned whether it was necessary at all.

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Tradition, multimodal composition & Oscar Wilde

In March 2013, John Caruso posted a two-part series on digital democracy. Those posts prompted a lively conversation here at the Marylhurst blog about digital citizenship, digital writing, multimedia, co-learning and participatory culture. In response to this ongoing dialogue, Tiffany Timperman offers her perspective on composition and multimodality.

by Tiffany Timperman

“The moral life of man forms part of the subject-matter of the artist, but the morality of art consists in the perfect use of an imperfect medium.” – Oscar Wilde, “The Preface,” The Picture of Dorian Gray

I want to consider the ways that multimodality can enrich composition: process and product. Traditional composition focuses on alphabetic text styled according to a rhetorical mode of writing (narrative, descriptive, argumentative, expository), purpose (to convince, persuade, entertain, inform), audience, and disciplinary guideline (MLA, APA, Chicago Style). Multimodal composition incorporates, as the term suggests, multiple modes to create a whole, and in the sense that we now have new and emerging technologies and materials, composition has increased potential and design elements to draw from.

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