Archives: Editorials

Digital-Democracy_700

Digital democracy & American anti-intellectualism: Part II

by J.C. Caruso

Last week I wrote a post about some of the challenges we face in a digital age where expertise and authority seem to be under constant attack, but I’d like to follow that up here by exploring this issue from a slightly different angle.

What I see as the crux of our current challenge is this: how can we ensure that the digital democratization of human knowledge does not become mired in the same anti-intellectualism that has for so long been a hallmark of our American democracy?

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DigitalDemocracy2_700

Drowning in Digital Democracy: Part I

By J.C. Caruso

It’s become commonplace, and maybe even a little passé, to describe our own ongoing digital revolution as analogous the advent of Gutenberg’s printing press in the 15th century.  Indeed, some points of comparison do continue to seem remarkably apt.  For example, the role of printed documents in spreading new ideas during the Reformation looks a lot like activists using Facebook and Twitter to share news and schedule protests during the Arab Spring.  Both show how technology can be a powerful force for democratization.  (Apologies if I’m stepping on any toes by seeming to valorize the Reformation as a positively democratic movement on the blog of a Catholic university, but you know what I mean.)

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Daily-dose_700

Lower your daily dose

by Jo Jenner

Faced with the diagnoses of infertility, my sister’s solution was to remove daily doses of toxins.  Her hormones did return to natural levels, which facilitated her successful pregnancy and birth of my nephew. These success stories of regained health are common and attributed to limiting the chemicals brought into the home and, ultimately, our bodies.

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Learn_700

The learning relationships of online education

by Eileen Schiffer

I often think of my role in the educational process. I take my responsibilities seriously and am firmly committed to making a meaningful contribution to the university and to my students. At least equally, though (probably more), I’m cognizant of how very much I gain, personally and professionally, from my relationships with the school, my colleagues and my students. While it may seem obvious that each of us in this triad has an impact on the others, in the midst of the daily demands of teaching and learning, we likely take few opportunities to consciously reflect on our reciprocal responsibilities and benefits.

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A Slanted View

by Simon Tam

I play bass in what’s often known as the first and only all-Asian American dance rock band in the world. We perform at many of the largest Asian cultural festivals in North America. We’ve been featured in and on over 1,500 radio stations, websites, magazines, and tv shows talking about the Asian American experience. My band members and I often facilitate workshops on cultural diversity, racism, and stereotypes about Asian and Asian American culture. In fact, when you look up information on the band, it’s hard to find anything that doesn’t associate us with Asian American culture, which is why when the U.S Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) said that our band was disparaging to persons of Asian descent, I was rather shocked.

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Fiscal-cliff_700

Of cliffs, taxes and community

by Barry Bennett

At 9:30 p.m. on New Year’s Eve, after almost a year of Congressional avoidance and posturing, we skidded to a stop at the very edge of the fiscal cliff. Or at least an agreement of sorts was reached. Having averted the possibly catastrophic alternative, we can look back from the edge and marvel at our political system’s astonishing ability to turn the trivial into the phantasmagoric, as it did when it debated which tiny number of Americans—families making over $250,000, $600,000, or $1,000,000—should be subject to a modest tax increase. The magic figure of $450,000, together with various other compromises, led to a deal at the not-quite eleventh hour.

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