Archives: Students

coptic-thanksgiving-reflection

Celebrating America and remembering the motherland: making meaning of Thanksgiving

We’re celebrating contemplation and gratitude all week long. Read more Thanksgiving reflections, by students, faculty and alumni, at The Gero-Punk Project.

by Philipos Ghaly

I was born and raised in Cairo, Egypt, and became a participant of the American story in my early adulthood. All my memories of family gatherings, annual holidays, and festal cuisines are native to Coptic (native Egyptian Christian) culture. This meant that I could make little personal meaning for a holiday like thanksgiving, for unlike my American friends, I had no family stories to tell of past thanksgiving days, nor did I have memories of the smell of my aunt’s turkey or the taste of my grandmother’s pumpkin pie. Over the years however, I acquired memories that helped incorporate me into the American collective experience of the holiday, beyond the opportunity of dietary indulgence and exaggerated alcohol consumption.

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FSS-cohort-group

Introducing the first Food Systems & Society cohort…

This fall, we’re welcoming our first cohort into the MS in Food Systems & Society program. The graduate students hail from Oregon, Washington, Georgia, Massachusetts, California and Minnesota. Their research interests and community activities range from environmental sustainability to labor laws, food insecurity to nutrition, food banking to farmers’ markets. Learn a little more — […]

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candyce-scott-kinetic-sculpture

The restorative aspect of kinetic art

by Candyce Scott Most people have experienced a feeling of elation in listening to music or watching the surf from the beach. There are visual experiences — such as watching a vibrant sunset or gazing at a beautiful piece of artwork — that causes an emotional response. These responses, in and of themselves, can be […]

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Italy_museum_jessicazisa

Two weeks in Rome

Eleven Marylhurst students arrived in Rome last week. Led by Dr. Meg Roland, they will spend two weeks of September studying, traveling and exploring this magnificent, ancient city. Follow their travels and writings at their individual blogs: Amy Guyer:  http://twoweeksinrome.wordpress.com Elizabeth Moscoso: http://spcgoestoroma.wordpress.com Carrie Padian:  http://dolcepepita.wordpress.com Ken Schultz: priamusviator.wordpress.com Amy Webber: http://vitaeccitante.wordpress.com Nate Wilkerson: wilkersonnate.wordpress.com Jessica Zisa: http://avventurearoma.wordpress.com For a taste […]

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500-words-of-advice

Student reflection: Advice in 500 words or less

by Simon Tam What if you only had 500 words of wisdom to share with your community, your children, or tomorrow’s leaders? This is what I’d tell them: Make every word count. I once heard that “language is the primary moral choice in our life”. The words we choose can build communities, reunite loved ones, […]

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padian-poetry

Student spotlight: Carrie Padian & poetry

by Carrie Padian The world is awash in love poetry, aching, longing, rapturous verses about how wonderful being in love is once you’ve finally found it. One thing you don’t hear a lot about, poemwise, is everything leading up to that magical moment: the mild failures, the swings and misses, that thing you thought was […]

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Shakespeare-mndnetprov

Shakespeare meets Twitter

Last Wednesday, June 12, 2013, Professor Keri Behre’s Shakespeare class completed their final exam. And this wasn’t any ordinary exam. The students performed the third act of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. On Twitter. Yeah, we are all here. This place will work just fine, let's practice the play.#mndnetprov — Quince Actor (@QuinceRules) June 13, 2013 […]

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Piano_harmon

To my students: a letter at commencement

by Sally Harmon

People who play the piano are usually successful. They are leaders, thinkers, inventors, creators, athletes and professionals — or well on the path to becoming so. The icing on your “cake” in life may be performing at beautiful venues for legions of adoring fans. Or, just an impromptu slide across the keys in some unlikely place: a hotel lobby, a school cafeteria, a friend’s house, a church basement, a college dorm or in the back corner of some office building. Friends, family, colleagues, and even strangers will marvel at the fact that it’s just one more thing you do well. They may even get a peek into your soul.

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