Archives: Students

Shakespeare-mndnetprov

Shakespeare meets Twitter

Last Wednesday, June 12, 2013, Professor Keri Behre’s Shakespeare class completed their final exam. And this wasn’t any ordinary exam. The students performed the third act of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. On Twitter. Yeah, we are all here. This place will work just fine, let's practice the play.#mndnetprov — Quince Actor (@QuinceRules) June 13, 2013 […]

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Piano_harmon

To my students: a letter at commencement

by Sally Harmon

People who play the piano are usually successful. They are leaders, thinkers, inventors, creators, athletes and professionals — or well on the path to becoming so. The icing on your “cake” in life may be performing at beautiful venues for legions of adoring fans. Or, just an impromptu slide across the keys in some unlikely place: a hotel lobby, a school cafeteria, a friend’s house, a church basement, a college dorm or in the back corner of some office building. Friends, family, colleagues, and even strangers will marvel at the fact that it’s just one more thing you do well. They may even get a peek into your soul.

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Zombie-Class

Reflections on zombie class

by Amy Webber

With a promise of an interesting subject, Dr. Jesse Stommel opened up his Zombies in Literature and Film class with a blog heading: “And now,” cried Max, “let the wild rumpus start!” along with the question: “Why Horror?” Through engaging conversation, we analyzed the human need to watch and read about horror and zombies.

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Telephone

Death of the Telephone

by Simon Tam

Last week, someone accused my work with social media marketing “irrelevant.” They claimed that organizations did not need an online marketing specialist — that it was a waste of resources. It reminded me of something I saw on television.

During the first season of Downton Abbey, there was an amusing bit when the family decided to install a telephone. It being 1914, no one knew how to use one. Several members of the household even questioned whether it was necessary at all.

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Earth-Day_700

Student reflection: Sustainability extends far beyond Earth Day

by Alex Mihm

Humankind’s imprint on our surroundings is everywhere, commingled with the natural. I am typing this on my back deck. The moon, nearly full, casts stark silhouettes of the cedars before me. The wind’s breath sighs through the boughs, and somewhere nearby a fussy crow is doing a poor job of keeping the location of its nest a secret. On a hillside across the Willamette, three towers flash red in a jerky rhythm. Straight overhead a commercial jet just narrowly avoids a collision with the Big Dipper. All of this is my —­­ our —­­ world, and it is important to remember that, no matter what we invent or build, nothing we can own will elevate us above it, for we are still natural beings born of the Earth. We need to understand how connected we are to this place, and then cultivate that relationship with both enthusiasm and respectful deference.

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Dream-of-college_700

Student reflection: pursuing the dream of college

by BreeAnna Bender

The year 2008 was a very difficult year for me and my young family. My husband was injured at work, which made me the sole provider for my family. In addition to raising my two young children and working full-time, I decided it was time to change my life. Only I didn’t know how.

I had always wanted a college education, but I felt it was out of my reach. My reality was filled with children, work and everyday life. How on earth was I going to find time to go back to school? As if someone was reading my mind, a commercial for Marylhurst University came on the television. It spoke of a university that catered to the needs of working-adult students who lead busy lives, but that wasn’t what made me jump on my computer as soon as the commercial was over.

They had a degree in English Literature and Writing.

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slanted-view_700

A Slanted View

by Simon Tam

I play bass in what’s often known as the first and only all-Asian American dance rock band in the world. We perform at many of the largest Asian cultural festivals in North America. We’ve been featured in and on over 1,500 radio stations, websites, magazines, and tv shows talking about the Asian American experience. My band members and I often facilitate workshops on cultural diversity, racism, and stereotypes about Asian and Asian American culture. In fact, when you look up information on the band, it’s hard to find anything that doesn’t associate us with Asian American culture, which is why when the U.S Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) said that our band was disparaging to persons of Asian descent, I was rather shocked.

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