Archives: community

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Cross-post: Springtime at Marylhurst

Originally published on June 12, 2014 in Coffee and Curiosity.

A photo essay by Katie Pippel

Hello, dear readers. Believe it or not, I think of you often. But graduate school has demanded most of my writing-energy and time, so I’ve been away from my WordPress. Luckily, my professors seem to like my writing as much as you do, reader, and that means a lot to me. I’m halfway through my program, and it’s been a whirlwind. Here are a few glimpses.

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A Marylhurst romance

by Jenna Preston My husband Zack and I can only be described as “music nerds.” Or at least that’s what we jokingly call ourselves. We met in music theory class at Central Oregon Community College in Bend, Oregon. Although we barely shared two words for the first six months of our acquaintance, we soon became […]

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Celebrating America and remembering the motherland: making meaning of Thanksgiving

We’re celebrating contemplation and gratitude all week long. Read more Thanksgiving reflections, by students, faculty and alumni, at The Gero-Punk Project.

by Philipos Ghaly

I was born and raised in Cairo, Egypt, and became a participant of the American story in my early adulthood. All my memories of family gatherings, annual holidays, and festal cuisines are native to Coptic (native Egyptian Christian) culture. This meant that I could make little personal meaning for a holiday like thanksgiving, for unlike my American friends, I had no family stories to tell of past thanksgiving days, nor did I have memories of the smell of my aunt’s turkey or the taste of my grandmother’s pumpkin pie. Over the years however, I acquired memories that helped incorporate me into the American collective experience of the holiday, beyond the opportunity of dietary indulgence and exaggerated alcohol consumption.

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Death of the Telephone

by Simon Tam

Last week, someone accused my work with social media marketing “irrelevant.” They claimed that organizations did not need an online marketing specialist — that it was a waste of resources. It reminded me of something I saw on television.

During the first season of Downton Abbey, there was an amusing bit when the family decided to install a telephone. It being 1914, no one knew how to use one. Several members of the household even questioned whether it was necessary at all.

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