Archives: community

turkey poults

Tweets aren’t always digital

This essay, by Marylhurst Postmaster Mark D. Smith, first appeared on the United States Postal Service blog. We thought our readers would enjoy it in the spirit of the season.

One morning in late summer 2012, I arrived at my job as Postmaster Relief at the Donald, OR, Post Office in Oregon’s rural Marion County. It’s a quiet little town with a quiet little Post Office, but this day there was a new sound – something familiar but often ignored. Birds, chirruping and twittering. But these were no digital tweets. This was real life.

A good number of Donald’s customers work in farming, and this morning’s singing telegram was a shipment of infant turkeys belonging to a local man planning to raise them for Thanksgiving. I phoned him at the number listed on the carefully-prepared Priority Mail packaging, and he arrived an hour later to collect his musical treasures. Before he arrived, I went about my morning tasks of sorting and distributing the day’s mail. But there was something more than just birdsong in the air. Something almost meditative stirred my soul, reconnecting me to the larger, natural world that gets no notice in the Information Age.

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totes

Marylhurst Partnerships: Building a Community

by Darwin Riviere

Our university has solid partnerships with PCC, Mt. Hood Community College, the American Association of University Women, and our neighbors at Mary’s Woods. These partnerships help us expand the community of learners and educators that we live in. Broadening what we can do for our students, faculty, and alums in providing them with a holistic education.

Our partnerships with community colleges help us make school more affordable for future and current students. Double-enrollment and easier credit transfers mean that going from a community college to Marylhurst can be a smooth transition. I didn’t know about Marylhurst’s partnerships with community colleges in and surrounding Portland, but when I transferred from PCC Cascade and Sylvania in 2011, all but ten of my credits transferred with me and I hadn’t even completed my Associates transfer degree. This made the rest of my four-year degree go very quickly as there were no credits I had to retake once at M.U.

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Cross-post: Springtime at Marylhurst

Originally published on June 12, 2014 in Coffee and Curiosity.

A photo essay by Katie Pippel

Hello, dear readers. Believe it or not, I think of you often. But graduate school has demanded most of my writing-energy and time, so I’ve been away from my WordPress. Luckily, my professors seem to like my writing as much as you do, reader, and that means a lot to me. I’m halfway through my program, and it’s been a whirlwind. Here are a few glimpses.

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jenna-wedding1

A Marylhurst romance

by Jenna Preston My husband Zack and I can only be described as “music nerds.” Or at least that’s what we jokingly call ourselves. We met in music theory class at Central Oregon Community College in Bend, Oregon. Although we barely shared two words for the first six months of our acquaintance, we soon became […]

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coptic-thanksgiving-reflection

Celebrating America and remembering the motherland: making meaning of Thanksgiving

We’re celebrating contemplation and gratitude all week long. Read more Thanksgiving reflections, by students, faculty and alumni, at The Gero-Punk Project.

by Philipos Ghaly

I was born and raised in Cairo, Egypt, and became a participant of the American story in my early adulthood. All my memories of family gatherings, annual holidays, and festal cuisines are native to Coptic (native Egyptian Christian) culture. This meant that I could make little personal meaning for a holiday like thanksgiving, for unlike my American friends, I had no family stories to tell of past thanksgiving days, nor did I have memories of the smell of my aunt’s turkey or the taste of my grandmother’s pumpkin pie. Over the years however, I acquired memories that helped incorporate me into the American collective experience of the holiday, beyond the opportunity of dietary indulgence and exaggerated alcohol consumption.

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Telephone

Death of the Telephone

by Simon Tam

Last week, someone accused my work with social media marketing “irrelevant.” They claimed that organizations did not need an online marketing specialist — that it was a waste of resources. It reminded me of something I saw on television.

During the first season of Downton Abbey, there was an amusing bit when the family decided to install a telephone. It being 1914, no one knew how to use one. Several members of the household even questioned whether it was necessary at all.

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