Archives: sustainability

donna-dorio

From beginning to beginning again

by Donna D’Orio I do not remember a time when I was not drawn to utilitarian, traditional art forms. The texture of handwoven dishtowels, crockery bowls out of kilns from Kentucky and North Carolina, and hand-hewn axe blades were part of my everyday childhood world. It did not go by me unnoticed, the difference, when […]

view
wind-farm-jay-beeks

Life is good in 2050

Originally published in the November issue of The Solutions Journal.

by Jay Beeks

The year 2050 is a good time to look back on the major events in the United States since the turn of the century. There have been great hardships, but we have prevailed and achieved so much. Without question, our greatest challenges have been the unparalleled loss of life and the tremendous destruction caused by global climate change. Fortunately, what at times seemed like the inevitable obliteration of society has subsided to ongoing difficulties interspersed with moments of achievement. Given what could have been had we decided not to act, we have reason to celebrate.

view
Sustainability_kaval

Sustainability: Practice, shared knowledge & conversation

by Dr. Pamela Kaval When I was just eight years old, I remember my brother catching a fish in the Passaic River of New Jersey with three eyes and another with two tails. Even though I was only a child, I knew that meant that something was wrong with the river. It wasn’t until I […]

view
FSS-cohort-group

Introducing the first Food Systems & Society cohort…

This fall, we’re welcoming our first cohort into the MS in Food Systems & Society program. The graduate students hail from Oregon, Washington, Georgia, Massachusetts, California and Minnesota. Their research interests and community activities range from environmental sustainability to labor laws, food insecurity to nutrition, food banking to farmers’ markets. Learn a little more — […]

view
Earth-Day_700

Student reflection: Sustainability extends far beyond Earth Day

by Alex Mihm

Humankind’s imprint on our surroundings is everywhere, commingled with the natural. I am typing this on my back deck. The moon, nearly full, casts stark silhouettes of the cedars before me. The wind’s breath sighs through the boughs, and somewhere nearby a fussy crow is doing a poor job of keeping the location of its nest a secret. On a hillside across the Willamette, three towers flash red in a jerky rhythm. Straight overhead a commercial jet just narrowly avoids a collision with the Big Dipper. All of this is my —­­ our —­­ world, and it is important to remember that, no matter what we invent or build, nothing we can own will elevate us above it, for we are still natural beings born of the Earth. We need to understand how connected we are to this place, and then cultivate that relationship with both enthusiasm and respectful deference.

view