ELNM Student Cohort (photography by Darwin Riviere)

A Weekend @ Marylhurst – The English Lit. & New Media Residency

In Summer our campus, for the most part, is quiet and still. However, for the past three days it has been host to a flurry of creativity.

Our English Literature and New Media (ELNM) students, who do a majority of their work online, have just completed one of their on-campus residency weekends. The residency is when our ELNM students fly, drive, and bus in to participate in an intense twenty-four hours worth of multimedia courses.

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Cross-post: Springtime at Marylhurst

Originally published on June 12, 2014 in Coffee and Curiosity.

A photo essay by Katie Pippel

Hello, dear readers. Believe it or not, I think of you often. But graduate school has demanded most of my writing-energy and time, so I’ve been away from my WordPress. Luckily, my professors seem to like my writing as much as you do, reader, and that means a lot to me. I’m halfway through my program, and it’s been a whirlwind. Here are a few glimpses.

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Advocating for older workers: 8 practical and beneficial attributes

by Kathryn Hubbell

There are many reports out there telling older workers that no one wants them, or that they will have a lot of difficulty finding a job. One such report in U.S. News two years ago listed misconceptions about older workers, such as short terms on the job if they planned to retire soon, higher salary expectations and reluctance to report to younger bosses.

Fortunately, a number of articles since than have refuted the myths, advocating why hiring older workers is a very good idea. Brian Solis, an expert in social media public relations and whose work I frequently use in my classes, reminds us that one of the things Baby Boomers bring to the office is a “raw work ethic.” He gives an excellent guide to Millennials navigating the workplace in this article and advocates for mutual respect between the generations.

I teach a lot of older workers, and I’m one myself. Let me weigh in for a moment on some of the great, practical attributes older workers bring to their jobs – and by “older,” I don’t just mean Baby Boomers. I also mean workers aged 35 to 70 or so, encompassing at least a couple of generations.

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Serving the underserved in Guatemala

by Margaret Allee

And so the adventure begins…

“This is what we are about. We plant the seeds that one day will grow.” Archbishop Oscar Romero.

As our 2014 Wells 390 Village Team prepares for departure tomorrow, I am reminded of the profound teaching of slain Archbishop Oscar Romero. Our team of 40 healthcare and dental providers from around the country, but the majority from the Portland area, will depart on Friday, March 7th to serve the people of Guatemala.

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London + Rome travel opportunity

by Lynn Brown Every time I see my dad, he asks me: “Have you been to Rome?”  He believes that experiencing Rome is necessary for understanding western civilization, literature and art. So, to honor my father, I will be joining Meg Roland, Marylhurst students and alumni for a study abroad session to London and Rome […]

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From beginning to beginning again

by Donna D’Orio I do not remember a time when I was not drawn to utilitarian, traditional art forms. The texture of handwoven dishtowels, crockery bowls out of kilns from Kentucky and North Carolina, and hand-hewn axe blades were part of my everyday childhood world. It did not go by me unnoticed, the difference, when […]

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A Marylhurst romance

by Jenna Preston My husband Zack and I can only be described as “music nerds.” Or at least that’s what we jokingly call ourselves. We met in music theory class at Central Oregon Community College in Bend, Oregon. Although we barely shared two words for the first six months of our acquaintance, we soon became […]

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Cross-post: How the passive voice kills your message

Originally published on January 30, 2014 in Sightline Daily.

by Anna Fahey

As I listened to President Obama’s State of the Union speech Tuesday night, I admit I was encouraged and moved at times. But I couldn’t help giving each sentence Anat Shenker-Osorio’s passive-voice test.

Shenker-Osorio is author of “Don’t Buy It: The Trouble with Talking Nonsense About the Economy.” She’s a language researcher and consultant and one of my favorite messaging gurus.

As she wrote in the Boston Globe a while back, when Obama—or anybody—uses the passive, they invariably fail to say who is to blame or why the challenges and problems and outrages they’re describing exist in the first place. This failure, in turn, leaves us with no good clues about viable solutions. If we don’t know how we got here, it’s hard to figure out how we get where we want to go.

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