500-words-of-advice

Student reflection: Advice in 500 words or less

by Simon Tam What if you only had 500 words of wisdom to share with your community, your children, or tomorrow’s leaders? This is what I’d tell them: Make every word count. I once heard that “language is the primary moral choice in our life”. The words we choose can build communities, reunite loved ones, […]

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padian-poetry

Student spotlight: Carrie Padian & poetry

by Carrie Padian The world is awash in love poetry, aching, longing, rapturous verses about how wonderful being in love is once you’ve finally found it. One thing you don’t hear a lot about, poemwise, is everything leading up to that magical moment: the mild failures, the swings and misses, that thing you thought was […]

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Shakespeare-mndnetprov

Shakespeare meets Twitter

Last Wednesday, June 12, 2013, Professor Keri Behre’s Shakespeare class completed their final exam. And this wasn’t any ordinary exam. The students performed the third act of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. On Twitter. Yeah, we are all here. This place will work just fine, let's practice the play.#mndnetprov — Quince Actor (@QuinceRules) June 13, 2013 […]

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Piano_harmon

To my students: a letter at commencement

by Sally Harmon

People who play the piano are usually successful. They are leaders, thinkers, inventors, creators, athletes and professionals — or well on the path to becoming so. The icing on your “cake” in life may be performing at beautiful venues for legions of adoring fans. Or, just an impromptu slide across the keys in some unlikely place: a hotel lobby, a school cafeteria, a friend’s house, a church basement, a college dorm or in the back corner of some office building. Friends, family, colleagues, and even strangers will marvel at the fact that it’s just one more thing you do well. They may even get a peek into your soul.

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Energy-Lightbulb

A journey in home energy efficiency

by Zach Henkin

I have had a fascination for efficiency ever since my parents first installed a large globe-style fluorescent lamp to replace an incandescent overhead bulb in my childhood bedroom. This fascination for energy has steadily progressed and, as luck would have it, so has technology.

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Zombie-Class

Reflections on zombie class

by Amy Webber

With a promise of an interesting subject, Dr. Jesse Stommel opened up his Zombies in Literature and Film class with a blog heading: “And now,” cried Max, “let the wild rumpus start!” along with the question: “Why Horror?” Through engaging conversation, we analyzed the human need to watch and read about horror and zombies.

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Noelle_bfa-art-promotion

7 Days of Art

Countdown Day #2 Noelle Winiecki | Sculpture studio We’re counting down the days until our 2013 BFA Thesis Exhibition. Watch across social for behind-the-scenes photos of our BFA candidates and their artwork.   UPDATE: You can find all behind-the-scenes photos on our Pinterest board.

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Nuala-Ni-Dhomhnaill

The Irish language: hope through the words of a poet

by Ger Killeen

This is an excerpt of a talk given by Killeen at the annual Irish Language Day at Marylhurst University, May 18, 2013.

One of the most thumbed-through of the books I own in the Irish language is a dictionary: An Irish-English Dictionary compiled and edited by The Rev. Patrick S. Dinneen in 1904. I have other Irish-English dictionaries which are more useful to me than Dinneen’s, dictionaries that are printed in standard Roman type, unlike Dinneen’s which retains the half-uncial lettering and unreformed spelling in which Irish was written for centuries; dictionaries which have kept up with the times and can tell me the Irish words for “injection mould” and “file transfer protocol”; dictionaries laden with all the serviceable, civil service-concocted words necessary for communicating the intricacies of the bureaucratic machinery running the modern Irish state. These are all valuable dictionaries in their own right, and I depend on them almost daily. But I don’t love them the way I do Dinneen’s; I don’t take as much pleasure in them; and they are not nearly as heartbreaking.

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Telephone

Death of the Telephone

by Simon Tam

Last week, someone accused my work with social media marketing “irrelevant.” They claimed that organizations did not need an online marketing specialist — that it was a waste of resources. It reminded me of something I saw on television.

During the first season of Downton Abbey, there was an amusing bit when the family decided to install a telephone. It being 1914, no one knew how to use one. Several members of the household even questioned whether it was necessary at all.

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  • Adam-Graves-art-detail
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  • Adam-Graves-art-detail

Short Sands Serenade

by Adam Graves As I scrape off and revise another area of the painting, I am reminded of the phenomenological dialogue I have engaged in with this image, the subject, the materials, and the place. Revising is an attempt (sometimes desperate) to bring more truth to the dialogue. Sometimes it takes a big move or […]

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